Science and Free Will No unread replies. No replies. Discussion boards provide students an opportunity to share their unique perspective, make recommendations, provide an opinion, or answer a question

Science and Free Will No unread replies. No replies.

Discussion boards provide students an opportunity to share their unique perspective, make recommendations, provide an opinion, or answer a question about an issue. Each response should be professional and must be written well (follow rules of grammar and mechanics), clearly, and concisely. In general, students should support each of their claims using empirical evidence, logic and reason, or both. After posting a response, respond to another student’s post. When responding to others it is best to add support to their claims or add evidence or logic that goes against their claims. Please remain professional, constructive, and open-minded when responding to those whose perspectives differ.

Wegner quips, “We are enchanted by the operation of our minds and bodies into believing that we ‘uncaused causes,’ the origins of our own behavior (Wegner, 2008, p. 226). He suggests that it is alluring to believe that we are in fact, intentional agents, willing and goal setting, and desiring. However, the idea of free will is opposed to the idea of science. To be a scientist is to believe that everything has a cause (determinism) and although we may not be able to know what the cause is, if we had the right tools we could.  Did you buy a new car? Perhaps you justify it with a number internal desires, but in fact, if I could measure all the variables that went into the purchase, you would see that even your desire was caused by something external to you.Here please 1) discuss whether you lean toward free will or determinism (provide a short explanation), and 2) whether you see free will beliefs as contrary to scientific progress.

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