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P12-2.                

 (Accounting for Patents)             

 Fields Laboratories holds a valuable patent (No. 758-6002-1A) on a precipitator that prevents certain types of air pollution. Fields does not manufacture or sell the products and processes it develops. Instead, it conducts research and develops products and processes which it patents, and then assigns the patents to manufacturers on a royalty basis. Occasionally it sells a patent. The history of Fields patent number 758-6002-1A is as follows.

 Date Activity  Cost            

 2005-2006 Research conducted to develop precipitator  $384,000            

 Jan. 2007 Design and construction of a prototype  $87,600            

 Mar 2007 Testing of models  $42,000            

 Jan. 2008 Fees paid engineers and lawyer to prepare patent            

    application; patent granted June 30, 2004  $59,500            

 Nov. 2009 Engineering activity necessary to advance the  $81,500            

    design of the precipitator to the manufacturing  stage            

Dec. 2010 Legal fees paid to successfully defend precipitator            

    patent  $42,000            

 April 2011 Research aimed at modifying the design of the            

    patented precipitator  $43,000            

 July 2015 Legal fees paid in unsuccessful patent infringement            

    suit against a competitor  $34,000            

Fields assumed a useful life of 17 years when it received the initial precipitator patent. On January 1, 2013, it revised its useful life estimate downward to 5 remaining years. Amortization is computed for a full year if the cost is incurred prior to July 1, and no amortization for the year if the cost is incurred after June 30. The company’s year ends December 31.     

Instructions              

Compute the carrying value of patent No. 758-6002-1A on each of the following dates:              

(a)   December 31, 2008.             

(b)   December 31, 2012.             

(c)   December 31, 2015.             

Exercise 13-1            

How would each of the following items be reported on the balance sheet?            

Use either current assets, current liabilities, stockholder equity, current liability or long term liability, footnote disclosure, long term investments, Plant Equipment land ,

(a)  Accrued vacation pay.     

(b)  Estimated taxes payable.     

(c)  Service warranties on appliance sales.     

(d)  Bank overdraft.     

(e)  Employee payroll deductions unremitted.     

(f)  Unpaid bonus to officers.     

(g)  Deposit received from customer to guarantee performance of a contract.     

(h)  Sales taxes payable.     

(i)  Gift certificates sold to customers but not yet redeemed.     

(j)  Premium offers outstanding.     

(k)  Discount on notes payable.     

(l)  Personal injury claim pending.     

(m)  Current maturities of long-term debts to be paid from current assets.     

(n)  Cash dividends declared but unpaid.     

(o)  Dividends in arrears on preferred stock.     

(p)  Loans from officers.     

       

Exercise 13-3             

On December 31, 2014, Hattie McDaniel Company had $1,200,000 of short-term debt in the form of notes payable due February 2, 2015. On January 21, 2015, the company issued 25,000 shares of its common stock for $38 per share, receiving $950,000 proceeds after brokerage fees and other costs of issuance. On February 2, 2015, the proceeds from the stock sale, supplemented by an additional $250,000 cash, are used to liquidate the $1,200,000 debt. The December 31, 2014, balance sheet is issued on February 23, 2015.

Show how the $1,200,000 of short-term debt should be presented on the December 31, 2014, balance sheet.(Enter account name only and do not provide descriptive information.)

Exercise 13-5             

Matt Broderick Company began operations on January 2, 2013. It employs 9 individuals who work 8-hour days and are paid hourly. Each employee earns 10 paid vacation days and 6 paid sick days annually. Vacation days may be taken after January 15 of the year following the year in which they are earned. Sick days may be taken as soon as they are earned; unused sick days accumulate. Additional information is as follows.

Actual Hourly  Vacation Days Used  Sick Days Used

Wage Rate  by Each Employee  by Each Employee

2013  2014  2013  2014  2013  2014

$10     $11   0  9  4  5

Matt Broderick Company has chosen to accrue the cost of compensated absences at rates of pay in effect during the period when earned and to accrue sick pay when earned

Prepare journal entries to record transactions related to compensated absences during 2013 and 2014. (If no entry is required, select “No Entry” for the account titles and enter 0 for the amounts. Credit account titles are automatically indented when amount is entered. Do not indent manually.)

Compute the amounts of any liability for compensated absences that should be reported on the balance sheet at December 31, 2013 and 2014.

Exercise 13-8             

The payroll of YellowCard Company for September 2013 is as follows.             

Total payroll was $480,000, of which $110,000 is exempt from Social Security tax because it represented amounts paid in excess of $110,100 to certain employees. The amount paid to employees in excess of $7,000 was $400,000. Income taxes in the amount of $80,000 were withheld, as was $9,000 in union dues. The state unemployment tax is 3.5%, but YellowCard Company is allowed a credit of 2.3% by the state for its unemployment experience. Also, assume that the current FICA tax is 7.65% on an employee’s wages to $110,100 and 1.45% in excess of $110,100. No employee for YellowCard makes more than $125,000. The federal unemployment tax rate is 0.8% after state credit.

Prepare the necessary journal entries if (a) the wages and salaries paid and (b) the employer payroll taxes are recorded separately. (Round answers to 0 decimal places, e.g. 5,275. If no entry is required, select “No Entry” for the account titles and enter 0 for the amounts .Credit account titles are automatically indented when amount is entered. Do not indent manually.)

Exercise 13-11             

Sheryl Crow Equipment Company sold 500 Rollomatics during 2014 at $6,000 each. During 2014, Crow spent $20,000 servicing the 2-year warranties that accompany the Rollomatic. All applicable transactions are on a cash basis

Prepare 2014 entries for Crow using the expense warranty approach. Assume that Crow estimates the total cost of servicing the warranties will be $120,000 for 2 years. (If no entry is required, select “No Entry” for the account titles and enter 0 for the amounts. Credit account titles are automatically indented when amount is entered. Do not indent manually.)

Prepare 2014 entries for Crow assuming that the warranties are not an integral part of the sale. Assume that of the sales total, $150,000 relates to sales of warranty contracts. Crow estimates the total cost of servicing the warranties will be $120,000 for 2 years. Estimate revenues earned on the basis of costs incurred and estimated costs. (If no entry is required, select “No Entry” for the account titles and enter 0 for the amounts. Credit account titles are automatically indented when amount is entered. Do not indent manually.)

Exercise 14-4               

Celine Dion Company issued $600,000 of 10%, 20-year bonds on January 1, 2014, at 102. Interest is payable semiannually on July 1 and January 1. Dion Company uses the straight-line method of amortization for bond premium or discount.

Prepare the journal entries to record the following. (If no entry is required, select “No Entry” for the account titles and enter 0 for the amounts. Credit account titles are automatically indented when amount is entered. Do not indent manually.)

 (a)  The issuance of the bonds.             

(b)  The payment of interest and the related amortization on July 1, 2014.             

(c)  The accrual of interest and the related amortization on December 31, 2014.             

Exercise 14-13            

Matt Perry, Inc. had outstanding $6,000,000 of 11% bonds (interest payable July 31 and January 31) due in 10 years. On July 1, it issued $9,000,000 of 10%, 15-year bonds (interest payable July 1 and January 1) at 98. A portion of the proceeds was used to call the 11% bonds at 102 on August 1. Unamortized bond discount and issue cost applicable to the 11% bonds were $120,000 and $30,000, respectively.

 

Prepare the journal entries necessary to record issue of the new bonds and the refunding of the bonds.(Round answers to 0 decimal places, e.g. 38,548. If no entry is required, select “No Entry” for the account titles and enter 0 for the amounts. Credit account titles are automatically indented when amount is entered. Do not indent manually.)